Hyundai Kona 2018 Review: Active Long Term
Hyundai Kona 2018 Review: Active Long Term

Hyundai Kona 2018 Review: Active Long Term


Hyundai's Kona was a long time coming, with Japanese and some European manufacturers stealing a pretty decent march on South Korea. Even steady-as-she-goes Toyota got the wild-looking-but-mild-performing C-HR out ages before the Kona.

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The interesting thing about the Kona, though, is that it was always going to hit the ground running. Based on the benchmark i30 hatch and with the same loving attention from the Australian suspension team, the Kona's journey to the forecourt was a considered, careful one. One characteristically memorable blanket marketing campaign and they're everywhere.

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So we figured everywhere should also mean my driveway for six months, so Mickey Blue Eyes here (Try again - Ed) arrived in the dying days of January to keep us company.

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\"The The 'Vivid Blue' of our car resulted in the name Frank. (image credit: Peter Anderson)

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There are technically three models - Active, Elite and Highlander - and we went for the one everybody buys, the entry-level Active. In contrast to what is surely its arch-rival, Mazda's CX-3, you do need to spend a bit extra to snag auto emergency braking (AEB). So the base model Active (which is hardly the stripped-out bait-n-up-sell CX-3 Neo) starts at $24,500 with a further $1500 for the Safety Pack.

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That Safety Pack not only contains high and low speed AEB, but also adds lane departure warning, lane keep assist, forward collision warning, rear cross traffic alert, blind spot warning, driver attention detection and heated folding mirrors. That is $1500 well spent. The 'Vivid Blue' of our car - which resulted in the name Frank (Nope - Ed) - is a further $595, as is every other colour but white.

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Before the 'Safety Pack', you've got 16-inch alloy wheels, air-conditioning, six airbags, ABS, stability and traction controls, cloth trim, remote central locking, rear parking sensors, reversing camera, cruise control, auto halogen headlights, leather steering wheel and gear selector, power windows and mirrors and a space saver spare.

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\"TheThe Kona has auto halogen headlights. (image credit: Peter Anderson)
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\"TheThe Active gets 16-inch alloy wheels. (image credit: Peter Anderson)
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\"Inside,Inside, there is a leather steering wheel. (image credit: Peter Anderson)
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\"UnderUnder the boot floor is a space saver spare. (image credit: Peter Anderson)
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\"Inside,
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Power in the Active comes from Hyundai's rather accomplished 2.0-litre MPI (further up the range is the quick 1.6-litre turbo), with 110kW/180Nm to drag around 1300kg. The Active is a front-wheel drive proposition using Hyundai's own six-speed automatic.

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\"Hyundai's Hyundai's 2.0-litre MPI four-cylinder engine produces 110kW/180Nm. (image credit: Peter Anderson)

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Unlike the vast majority of its competition, the Kona has a half-decent six speaker stereo with (drum roll please) both Apple CarPlay and Android Auto, which makes up for a lack of sat nav.

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We've got plans for Bluey (definitely not - Ed) - road trips, ironic photos, reports on the daily grind and the usual tests of versatility, comfort and its ability to handle whatever our little family can throw it.

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2018 Hyundai Kona Active

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Acquired: February 2018
Distance travelled this month: 471km
Odometer: 584km
Average fuel consumption for July: 8.2L/100 (measured at the pump)

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